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Tribal Resilience

 
 

Tribal Adaptation Guidebook 

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New Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook Coming November 2018.

We are grateful have the opportunity to collaborate with the with Oregon Climate Change Research Institute at Oregon State University on a project funded by the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative and supported by a broad group of advisors and reviewers to develop a new tribally focused climate adaptation guidebook.

This Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook (to be released in November 2018) builds on the ongoing climate-related work in tribal communities, provides a framework for climate change adaptation planning in the context of existing tribal priorities, and directly considers the unique issues facing Indigenous communities. Specifically, this Guidebook directs readers to the foundation of existing resources and tribal adaptation efforts. It identifies opportunities for braiding together Traditional Knowledges and Western Science in developing adaptation plans. The framework outlined here will be useful for tribes in different phases of climate adaptation planning efforts. The framework also supports learning from the experiences, approaches, and lessons of tribes working to become more resilient to climate change. The Tribal Climate Adaptation Guidebook is designed to support tribes’ efforts to proactively adapt to climate change and thrive for generations to come.


Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Climate Change Assessment & Adaptation Plan

 Shoshone-Bannock Climate Adaptation Project Overview. This is one of a series of fact sheets designed to highlight the project and vulnerability and adaptation options for key species of concern

Shoshone-Bannock Climate Adaptation Project Overview. This is one of a series of fact sheets designed to highlight the project and vulnerability and adaptation options for key species of concern

The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, comprised of many bands of Shoshone and Bannock peoples whose very culture and history is intertwined with the lands in which they live, have historically subsisted through hunting and gathering. The Snake River Watershed, in present-day Idaho, continues to sustain the Tribes’ cultural, spiritual, dietary, and economic needs. Climate change presents a threat to critical cultural resources, thereby also threatening the lifeways and wellbeing of the Tribes. This creates an urgent need to build climate resilience to protect and preserve these resources for future generations.

Adaptation International partnered with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to complete a natural resource focused climate change vulnerability assessment and develop an adaptation workbook of actions that the tribe can use to enhance the resilience of a variety of critical habitats and species.   Read more by clicking on the following links:


Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation - Vulnerability Assessment & Adaptation Plan

We are collaborating with the Upper Snake River Tribes Foundation (USRT) to conduct a natural resource focused climate change vulnerability assessment and adaptation plan for the Upper Snake River Watershed and the USRT's four member tribes. The project spans hundreds of miles from the Burns Paiute Tribe in eastern Oregon to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe in eastern Idaho. We completed the collaborative climate change vulnerability assessment by work closely with our project partners the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute and the Climate Impacts Group and tribal staff members to evaluate the climate related vulnerabilities of key species, habitats, and resources of shared concern to the four USRT Tribes.  To see the results of this project check out:  

This Project Overview; The Executive Summary;  The summary sheets for shared resources of concern: Big Sagebrush, Chinook Salmon, Chokecherries, Columbia Spotted Frog, Geyer's Willow, Jackrabbit, Mule Deer, and Riparian Habitats; or If you really want all the details, read the full report and the appendices.


1854 Treaty Authority Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Plan

Taking a collaborative approach and working closely with the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessment Center, the 1854 Treaty Authority and their three tribes, we completed a climate change vulnerability assessment and adaptation plan for the territory. This natural resource focused assessment combined local climate projects with local and traditional knowledge and expertise to identify differential vulnerability of key species and ecosystems that are important to the tribes. We then developed customized adaptation strategies for eleven focus species. The Executive Summary for the full project report is available here.


Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

We worked alongside the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to complete a climate change vulnerability assessment and develop an associated technical report. Collaborating with a variety of tribal departments and the Oregon Climate Change Research Center (OCCRI), we helped the Tribe identify the potential climate impacts to key items of concern The items of concern range from first foods like Salmon and Cous, to homes, critical facilities, and agriculture.

You can check-out the final results of this project in three different ways:


Jamestown S'Klallam Tribal Climate Adaptation Project

Adaptation International worked alongside the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State to conduct a climate change vulnerability assessment and develop an adaptation plan for the tribal community.  Collaborating with Washington Sea Grant we tailored the project to the needs of the Tribe through the use of a rapid climate exposure assessment process and the selection of key areas of concern. The project included: maps of locally specific relative sea level rise scenarios; assessment of climate related vulnerabilities of key infrastructure and cultural assets; and some prioritized adaptation strategies to increase resilience. It has been great to work with a proactive community working to reduce their climate vulnerability.

Jamestown S'Klallam Climate Change Adaptation Report

Key Areas of Concern for the Tribe:  Salmon, Shellfish, Cedar Harvest, Wildfire, Casino and Longhouse Market, Highway 101, Tribal Campus Water Supplies, Infrastructure, Jamestown Beach Water Supplies.   

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flood Risk Zone Maps

 

Building Resilience Everywhere

Adaptation International is grateful to have had the opportunity to collaborate with the following communities on their resilience efforts.

 
 
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